tennessee scholastic clay target program
photo: tnwf.org

More than 2,000 youth athletes, from middle school to college, participated in the 2021 Tennessee Scholastic Clay Target Program State Championships on June 21 through 27 in Nashville.

State Championships spanned six full days of co-ed competition in three shotgun shooting sports disciplines: trap, skeet, and sporting clays, as well as doubles skeet, doubles trap, and extended yard line trap. Individuals and teams from all corners of the state competed for titles in more than 160 categories.

“Each year we are inspired by the dedication student athletes show and the support of their parents and coaches,” said JW Worthen, director of programs for Tennessee Wildlife Federation. “These athletes represent the future of outdoorsmen and women in Tennessee and ultimately the future of our great outdoors.”

The governing body of the sport in Tennessee is the Tennessee Scholastic Clay Target Program, an initiative of Tennessee Wildlife Federation. Tennessee Wildlife Federation is one of the largest and oldest nonprofits dedicated to the conservation of Tennessee’s wildlife and natural resources.

Tennessee Scholastic Clay Target Program recruits youth into an outdoor lifestyle by introducing them to the shooting sports. Those who participate in outdoor recreation are eight times more likely to support conservation issues.

TRAP

Intermediate Entry Level Team

1. Columbia Academy Gun Dawgs (Maury Co.)

2. Hardeman County Clay Dusters (Hardeman Co.)

3. Providence Christian Academy (Rutherford Co.)

Varsity Team

1. Middle Tennessee Christian School (Rutherford Co.)

2. Cumberland County Youth Shooting Sports (Cumberland Co.)

3. Collierville High School Trap Team (Shelby Co.)

About Tennessee Wildlife Federation

Tennessee Wildlife Federation is an independent nonprofit dedicated to conserving Tennessee’s wildlife, waters, and wild places. Since 1946, the Federation has spearheaded the development of the state’s wildlife policy, advanced landmark legislation on air and water quality and other conservation initiatives, helped restore numerous species, and introduced thousands of kids to the great outdoors. To learn more, visit tnwf.org.